Wisconsin Broadcasters Foundation

this site is an initiative of the Wisconsin Broadcasters Foundation
R. Perry Kidder

R. Perry Kidder

While I was studying journalism at the University of Texas at Austin, I witnessed a former UT Journalism student making an indelible mark on our profession.  By the time I graduated in 1971, Walter Cronkite was known as “the most trusted man in America”.  Ironically when you fast forward to  2011, I retired from that same CBS with nearly four decades of service.  Who would of guessed back in ’71 that I would be so influenced by this news legend.  It was clear from the beginning that ethics, honesty and hard work were the corner stone of excellence in journalism.  You don’t get to be the “most trusted” without those qualities.  Beyond that, great journalism requires the sources and resources to get to the truth. This website is devoted to those resources.  It is our hope that the Broadcast News Resource Center (BNRC) can be a broad based resource that will assist students and journalists through out Wisconsin, the U.S. and the world.  This site is devoted to the excellence in journalism that Walter and other news greats started.

When the opportunity came for me to help make this site a reality, to do what we can to better journalism….it seemed the perfect way to “close the loop” on a vision that Walter helped start in 1971.

Thanks to all that use this site.  Please let us know what else you would like to see and/or how to improve this news resource.  Should you find the BNRC useful please let others know.

  • October: Walker, Burke weigh in on openness October 1, 2014
    Mary Burke was succinct. She used a single word —“Yes” — to answer four of six questions from the Wisconsin Freedom of Information Council about open government. The Democratic candidate for governor responded affirmatively when asked if she would:   Release a detailed weekly calendar in advance listing her appointments, public meetings and travel schedule. […]
  • August: AG rivals all back more openness July 31, 2014
    In Wisconsin, the office of attorney general has the authority to interpret and prosecute the state’s open records and open meetings laws. It is arguably the most important office in the state for promoting and defending our tradition of open government. With that in mind, the Wisconsin Freedom of Information Council asked the three Democrats and one Republi […]
  • September: Disciplined workers should be named July 31, 2014
    When state employees misbehave, does the public have a right to know who they are? Two state agencies are answering that question in different ways. Both the state Department of Justice and Department of Natural Resources have in the recent past blacked out the names of state workers from records of disciplinary actions released to the media. The agencies cl […]
  • July: A wish-list for open government July 1, 2014
    Most candidates for public office, when asked, will pledge their support for open and transparent government. The real question is: Are they committed to fixing problems and expanding what information is available? Recently, the Wisconsin Freedom of Information Council drew up a “Legislative wish-list for open government” — changes in state law to improve ac […]
  • June: Media need photos to tell the story May 29, 2014
    In early May the newspaper I work for, the Wisconsin State Journal, requested the official portraits of the Madison police officers involved in the fatal shooting a few days earlier of a man police say had just stabbed two women to death. Although he’d released the officers’ names, Madison Police Chief Mike Koval initially balked at releasing their photos. P […]
  • Internships cause plenty of hardship and woe October 24, 2014
    Bad internships are like ill-fated summer romances: You go into them with an open heart and all the hope in the world, only to find out after three sizzling months they were using you the whole time. I’ve been fortunate in my fledgling career — and my love life — to steer clear of these summertime abusers. But like almost everyone working in journalism, I en […]
  • Canadian ban on printing Rehtaeh Parsons’ name extends to advertisements, family finds October 24, 2014
    Canada won’t allow its journalists to print Rehtaeh Parsons’ name, because she was a victim of child pornography. That ban extends to advertising, too, one of Parsons’ family members has found, even if an ad only includes what could be considered an oblique reference to the court case that invoked the publication ban. Rehtaeh Parsons (Photograph courtesy Cou […]
  • The Globe rolls out red carpet for documentary film October 24, 2014
    This year, editors at The Boston Globe noticed that they shared something important with Hollywood’s biggest night: three directors, all trained at nearby Harvard University, each got Oscar nods for documentary filmmaking. That got the paper’s attention. Globe editors had known for awhile that New England was a hotbed for documentarians, with big names like […]
  • From AIDS to Ebola: Journalism, disease, and the mentality of fear October 24, 2014
    I remember a day back in the 1980s when I first met a person who I thought had AIDS.  I was sitting at the front desk of the old storefront building of the Poynter Institute when a tall gaunt man entered through the glass doors and approached me with a question. I have forgotten his question, but I do remember being frightened by his appearance. He had sever […]
  • NBCUniversal settles intern lawsuit October 24, 2014
    Los Angeles Times NBCUniversal will pay $6.4 million to settle a class action lawsuit brought by former interns, Daniel Miller reports in the Los Angeles Times. The suit was originally brought last July by Jesse Moore and Monet Eliastam, who interned at MSNBC and “Saturday Night Live,” respectively, and “grew to include plaintiffs from other states,” Miller […]
Wisconsin Broadcasters Foundation

this site is an initiative of the Wisconsin Broadcasters Foundation